Loft & Learn Celebrates!!! | National Teacher’s Day!!!

Happy National Teacher’s Day to all the amazing educators out there.

You are more valuable than all of the professions combined because you teach and inspire us all!!

In a family of educators on both my mom and dad’s side as well as teachers and healers from my in law’s side of the family, I say a deep heartfelt thank you, you are truly appreciated! And to my favorite teacher of all time Mrs. J (Choral teacher Hannah Middle School) you opened my eyes to my potential and I will forever be grateful.

In honor of National Teachers Day I especially wanted to share a letter that was written to my Sis Marian “Mern” Stepter recently from one of her past students!! Kudos Mern, I am so proud of you and it must feel so good to know that you have impacted a life in this way!!! You Rock Girl.

Quoted Letter Below:

“This is very out of the blue and I’m not sure if you remember me but you were my first grade teacher almost 20 years ago. When I came into your classroom I was a new student that didn’t speak English, had just immigrated into the country, and kept forgetting to write down her name on papers. You taught me to read my first book ad I still remember getting bags of chips for math problems that we got correct. You taught me countless life lessons and started my education in America off better than I could have ever asked for. I think back a lot on your class, my first American classroom ever, especially today as I’m completing my last class ever at Tulane Law School in New Orleans. I will be taking the bar exam in July and then starting my career as an attorney. I hope you are doing well and if you are ever in Chicago let me know, I would love to get lunch. My parents and I praise you to this day. Thank you Ms. Stepter.”

 

 

Why You should invest in Osmo!! | Educational Tools

So I am so excited to share the amazing new learning system called Osmo.

Osmo is an award-winning game system that will change the way your child interacts with the iPad by opening it up to hands-on play. Osmo fosters learning in key areas such as: creative problem solving, art, STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and common core.

  • Coding teaches logic and problem solving skills.
  • Tangram fosters spatial relational skills.
  • Words teaches spelling and critical thinking skills.
  • Newton fosters creative problem solving skills.
  • Masterpiece teaches drawing and creative confidence.
  • Numbers teaches counting, addition and multiplication.
  • Pizza Co. teaches math, money, fractions and nonverbal communication.

You just need an iPad with a camera. Osmo is compatible with: iPad 2, iPad (3rd Generation), iPad (4th Generation), iPad Mini, iPad Mini 2, iPad Mini 3, iPad Mini 4, iPad Air, iPad Air 2 and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro

 Osmo

Osmo is designed especially for kids 4-12 but all ages can enjoy, trust me! There are 7 individual games currently available

Coding

Osmo Coding uses hands-on physical blocks to control Awbie, a playful character who loves delicious strawberries. Each block is a coding command that directs Awbie on a wondrous tree-shaking, strawberry-munching adventure.

Monster

Bring your drawings to life! Each item you draw for Mo will be magically pulled into his world. Together create animated activities to share with family and friends.

Tangram

Arrange wooden puzzle pieces to match on-screen shapes. Animals, objects, humans and more. Play with a friend or challenge yourself to increasingly more difficult levels as your handiwork lights up with each victory.

Masterpiece

Unleash your inner artist! Pick an image from the camera, web or curated gallery and Masterpiece will transform it into easy-to-follow lines, helping you create beautiful drawings.

Pizza Co.

Make pizza… grow your profit! Quickly cook pizza & calculate change using topping & money tiles. Invest profits to upgrade your shop or open new locations as you bake your way to becoming “the big cheese”!

Words

Guess and spell the on-screen image. Team up or compete in-person with friends or family to see who will get their letter in first! Download free content like trivia, geography or upload your own like family names. The possibilities are endless!

Newton

Newton works with any object or drawing – Mom’s keys, hand-drawn basket, even toys you already own. Simply place the object/drawing in front of the screen and manipulate it to guide the falling balls into the target zones.

So much fun for all, and it is always such a joy when you can see the light go off in your little one’s head when they are so proud to learn something new. Both Ace and Kingston play for extended periods of time and truly enjoy it. Thanks Auntie Mern and Uncle Cleve, great gift!!!

Loft & Learn | Legendary Hall of Fame Racer Eugene Coard!!!

My Day with Eugene Coard!!!

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I was so fortunate recently to be invited to speak with the legendary racing Hall of Famer Mr. Eugene Coard. He is truly an extraordinary man who along with other members of the famous “Mutt Brothers” changed the scope of street,drag and pro stock racing. He is so charismatic and is quick to share his journey of racing back then for African-Americans along with his ventures post racing in the entertainment industry as a blues artist, rapper and manager!! 

A film is currently being filmed about his significant and historic contributions to the pro stock racing and drag racing industry. Make sure to check out his book “Hole Shot”

 

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It’s Library Time | Reading Is Fun

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Take advantage of your local library!!!

 

 

 

There’s no better way to get your kids out of the house when you’re on a budget than to head to your local library. It’s about more than just checking out some new books to read together. Today’s libraries offer a world of fun with their free membership.

1. Free Books

Obviously, the most well-known benefit of joining the library is that you and your children are able to read books for free. This means that you’ll never have a stack of books your child is bored with, and your child will be exposed to many different books about all different subjects. And you won’t have to open your wallet.

2. Reading Programs

Many local libraries offer help story-time with including online read-along programs in addition to reading lists for every age, online tutors, and research databases.

3. Free Programs

Most of today’s libraries offer free musical programs, story times and craft hours for children. It’s a great way to get out of the house and have some fun together. Plus your child’s brain will be boosted by the exposure to music, reading, and crafts.

4. Play Areas

If you have children of various ages, you won’t have to worry about keeping the little one entertained while the older one checks out some books or visits story time. There is likely a play area in the children’s section with fun toys to keep your toddler occupied.

5. New Friends

When you visit the local library, you’re likely to meet other parents, which opens the door to making new friends for both you and your children.

6. Discounts at Other Local Spots

Local libraries often offer members discounted visits to local museums, aquariums, and other fun spots for families. All you have to do is ask at the front desk and you can sign out a discount card to take with you to the local children’s museum.

7. eBooks

Libraries have entered the digital age. You can borrow eBooks without even leaving your home with a virtual library that can be accessed from anywhere.

Libraries are one of the best resources a town has to offer. If you haven’t taken advantage of the benefits of having a membership, now is the time. Plus, your child will feel so grown up with her own library card.

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Fun Day On Campus! | University of South Carolina

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What a fun day we had touring the University of South Carolina in Columbia. It’s important to us to expose our boys to museums, parks, and many other educational outlets, but none as important than higher education. We often like to visit college campuses during our travels subconsciously introducing them to life on campus.

I believe exposing them to this type of diverse environment at an early age,plants seeds of what life will be like for them down the road. Watching kids reading out on the lawn while catching sun,  where others are gathered in discussion nearby, or a group gathered for fun sports shows them just a peak of the many great benefits and joys of higher education aside from the obvious. We had a picnic and a ball on campus!!!

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Congratulations Jeana!!! | Howard University

Way to go Cousin Jeana! She is graduating High School and attending prestigious Howard University in the fall!! We are so proud of you.

Below is an awesome picture of Jeana with her Mom, Superior Court Judge Sherry-Hutchinson Henderson and The President of Howard University, Wayne Frederick.

Jeanna Howard Bound

Kiddie Book Club | Just Like Me Book Box

I am so excited to share this tip of a book program called the Just Like Me Book Box!

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My Cousin JR passed this info along and after researching, I have found this to be an amazing book club that focuses on diversity. It doesn’t hurt that your child will receive their very own package in the mail once a month with selected books of choice. Very cool idea! Thanks Cuz!

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More Fun With Leap TV | Educational Gaming System

Leap TV Educational Gaming System

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Can’t say enough about the leap tv system we have. Ace and Kingston play effortlessly while learning with cool educational games they can relate to.

Travel Spotlight***Beautiful & Magical Ireland. (Mayo, County) | Loft & Learn, Ireland

 

Travel Spotlight***Beautiful & Magical Ireland

After Graduating from Michigan State University, Colin took an amazing trip to Europe and although he loved all of the countries he was able to visit, to this day he raves about his awesome experience in Ireland. He was able to visit Mayo County where his relatives are from. He speaks so highly of this beautiful country, from the country side in all shades of green, to the magical folklore and the friendly and truly joyful people.

Now Colin’s mother Wendy is heading for the “Green Isle”. In April she will take an amazing trip flying first to Shannon, Ireland. Their package for Western Ireland includes a car allowing them to travel around the ring of Kerry, Cliffs of Mohr, and Dingle Bay. After staying at the Killarney Royal she then heads to Ennis staying at the Temple Gate Hotel. After this she will jump over to London to see Colin’s brother Ryan who has moved overseas for work and loves it! This trip sounds so exciting, I can’t wait to see the pictures!!! (of course I will share…)

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The island of Ireland historically consists of 32 counties, of which six, collectively known as Northern Ireland, have remained as part of the United Kingdom since the rest of Ireland gained self government in 1922. The name “Ireland” applies to the island as a whole, but in English is also the official name of the independent state (ie the 26 counties which are not part of the United Kingdom), since 1921.

Celtic tribes settled on the island in the 4th century BC. Invasions by Norsemen that began in the late 8th century were finally ended when King Brian Boru defeated the Danes in 1014. Norman invasions began in the early 12th century and set in place Ireland’s uneasy position within England’s sphere of influence. The Act of Union of 1800 – in which Catholics, 90% of the Irish population, were excluded from Parliament – saw Ireland joining the United Kingdom. In the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th century the subject of Irish home rule was a major debate within the British parliament.

After several failed attempts, a Home Rule bill finally passed through parliament in 1914 though the start of the first world war saw its indefinite postponement due to heavily armed unionist opposition. A failed rebellion on Easter Monday in 1916, (after which 15 of the surrendered leaders were shot by firing squad and 1 hanged) showed a hint of things to come with years of war to follow, beginning with the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921) and continuing with the Irish Civil War (1922-1923).

Ireland Cliffs

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Eventually a somewhat stable situation emerged with the self government of 26 of Ireland’s counties known as the Irish Free State; the remaining six, located in the north of the country comprising two-thirds of the ancient province of Ulster, remained part of the United Kingdom — a status that has continued to the present day. In 1949 the Irish Free State became “Ireland” (a.k.a. the Republic of Ireland) and withdrew from the British Commonwealth of Nations. English is spoken everywhere but Irish (Gaeilge) is the first official language. It is part of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic family of languages.

Most people have some understanding of Irish but it is used as a first language by approximately 170,000 people, most of whom live in rural areas known as the Gaeltachts. About 55% (c. 2,500,000) of people in the Republic claim to understand and speak the language. As the Gaeltachts are generally scenic areas it is likely that visitors will go there. Tourists are not expected to speak Irish, but attempts at speaking Irish with the locals are greatly appreciated. The language will also be noticeable on road signs, etc. For instance, a law was recently passed that changes the name of Dingle, County Kerry to An Daingean, the Irish version. This should not confuse visitors, as almost all recent maps carry placenames in both languages in Gaeltacht districts.

In order to enter most Irish Universities, it is necessary for Irish citizens to have taken Irish to Leaving Certificate (Examinations taken on leaving secondary or high school) level, and passed. Indeed it is a compulsory language at school in the Republic, although its method of teaching has come under criticism. Nevertheless, although it has come under threat, and some resent being forced to learn the language, others see use of the language as an expression of national pride.

Mayo County Ireland Pre History

Ire Mayo county

Ireland Mayo County Flag
County Mayo has a rich archaeological heritage dating from prehistoric times to the present. (Achaeology is the interpretation of our past from the study of buildings and objects made by human beings. We are dependent on archaeology alone in any attempt to study the prehistoric period and thereafter to complement what is recorded in written sources). According to the present state of archaeological knowledge, the first people arrived in Ireland sometime before 7000 BC during what is called the Mesolithic period. They were nomadic tribes of hunters and fishing people who built no permanent structures such as houses or tombs. The first colonisation of Mayo probably took place during that period.
In the fourth millennium BC, during the Neolithic period, another group of settlers arrived in Ireland, our first farmers, who introduced agriculture and animal husbandry to the country as well as the skills of pottery-making and weaving. They started a custom of burying their dead collectively (usually cremated) in large stone-built chambered tombs known as megalithic tombs, the earliest surviving architectural structures in the country. There are over 1,500 such tombs identified in Ireland with approximately 160 in County Mayo. This fact indicates the importance of the Mayo region during the Neolithic period and into the Bronze Age (c. 2000- 400 BC) when this phase of tomb-building came to an end.

Early Christian Period
The early history of the county is obscure and frequently confusing with various tribes seeking control. Christianity came to Ireland at the start of the fifth century, if not earlier, and brought about many changes, including the introduction of writing and reading. St. Patrick, Ireland’s national apostle, whose floruit was the fifth century, is chiefly credited with the conversion of the pagan Gaels. Recent research indicates that St. Patrick spent considerable time in County Mayo, where according to tradition and some written sources he spent forty days and nights on the summit of Croagh Patrick fasting and praying for the people of Ireland; and had associations with places like Aghagower near Westport, Ballintubber (well-known nowadays for its medieval abbey which has remained in continuous use through all vicissitudes from its foundation in 1216); and Foghill near Killala, which has been identified by some writers with the Silva Vocluti , ‘the wood of Fochluth beside the western sea’ mentioned by Patrick himself in his Confessio.
From the middle of the sixth century onwards, hundreds of small monastic settlements were established around the country, many of which became very important. Some examples of well-known early monastic sites in Mayo include Mayo itself near Balla, Aughagower, Inishmaine, Ballintubber, Errew, Kilmore Erris, Balla, Cong, Killala, Turlough, Moyne near Cross, and island settlements off the Mullet peninsula like Inishkea North, Inishkea South and Duvillaun More.
‘Mayo of the Saxons’
One of the most interesting monastic sites in Co. Mayo was that from which the county derives its name – Maigh Eo. Colmán of Lindisfarne, having been defeated by the ‘Romanist’ party at the synod of Whitby (in Northumbria, in the north-east of England) in 663, withdrew with his followers, via Iona, to Inishbofin off the west coast of Galway. As a result of disagreement between the Irish and the English monks in the little community, the latter moved to the ‘plain of yews’, about sixteen kilometres south-east of the present town of Castlebar. The monastery they established there, known as Mag nÉo na Sachsan (‘of the Saxons’), became renowned as a centre of learning, and continued to attract monks of English birth for a century and more after its foundation.

Vikings

The Vikings or Norsemen first attacked Ireland in 795 and Mayo around the start of the ninth century. On arrival, they started to plunder and loot places of wealth especially monasteries. It was partly in response to those attacks that round towers were later erected in monastic enclosures (most were erected in the 12 century). There are about 65 of these fine structures surviving in Ireland, with five located in County Mayo: Aughagower, Balla, Killala, Turlough and Meelock. The Viking invasion led to the establishment of settlements in a number of locations like Dublin, Cork, Wexford and Waterford which later developed into towns and cities.

The Great Famine

Early in the nineteenth century, there were a number of famines in Ireland, culminating in the Great Famine of 1845 – ’49, when about a million people died and a further million went into exile. The population increased from an estimated figure of four and a half million in 1800 to over eight million by 1841. The pressure of this vast increase exacerbated the fragile subsistence economy of the period, as land became subdivided into smaller and smaller plots. Destitution was already a fact of life for many and evictions became regular occurrences in the Irish countryside. Most of the impoverished population depended on the potato as their staple food product. Disaster struck in August 1845, when a killer fungus (later diagnosed as Phytophthora infestans ) started to destroy the potato crop.

The green stalks of potato ridges became blighted and within a short time the rotting crop was producing a terrible stench. About a third of the national potato crop was destroyed that year, and an almost complete failure the following year led to a catastrophe for the remainder of the decade. By ‘black forty-seven’, people were dying in their thousands from starvation-related diseases. The workhouses, built in the early 1840s to relieve appalling poverty, were unable to cope with the numbers seeking admission. Various parsimonious relief measures were inadequate to deal with the scale of the crisis.

The number of evictions increased. This process of ‘clearance’ (as it was called) was aided by the ‘quarter-acre clause’ (the infamous Gregory clause, called after its proposer, Sir William Gregory MP of Coole Park, Co. Galway) in the Poor Law Extension Act 1847 which excluded from relief anyone who had more than a quarter acre of land. Any such unfortunate person who was starving had to abandon his holding and go to the workhouse if he and his family wanted a chance to survive. Conditions became worse in 1848 and 1849, with various reports at the time recording dead bodies everywhere.

The catastrophe was particularly bad in County Mayo, where nearly ninety per cent of the population were dependent on the potato. By 1848, Mayo was a county of total misery and despair, with any attempts at alleviating measures in complete disarray. People were dying and emigrating in their thousands. We will never know how many died in the county during those terrible years. The ‘official’ statistics for the county show that the population dropped from 388,887 in 1841 to 274,499 in 1851, but it is accepted that the actual figure in 1841 was far higher than the official census return. It can safely be said that over 100,000 died in Mayo from the famine epidemic and emigration began on a big scale (there was some emigration before the Great Famine). Most emigrants from the county went to the USA, Canada, England and Scotland, to become part of the big Irish diaspora scattered throughout the world.

Ire Mayo county People

Irealand Matt Malloys  Irish Wishes--Happy St. Patricks Day

Irish stew and a pint of Guinness

Irish Stew and Guiness
Irish cuisine can charitably be described as hearty: virtually all traditional meals involve meat (especially lamb and pork), potatoes, and cabbage. Long cooking times are the norm and spices are limited to salt and pepper.

Classic Irish dishes include:

• Boxty, potato pancakes
• Champ, mashed potatoes with spring onions
• Coddle, a stew of potatoes, pork sausages and bacon; a speciality of Dublin
• Colcannon, mashed potatoes and cabbage
• Irish breakfast, a famously filling spread of bacon, eggs, sausages and white and/or black pudding, a type of pork sausage made with blood (black) or without (white). Irish Breakfast is often just refered to as a “fry”, and is usually available well past normal breakfast times in restaurants.
• Mixed Grill. Similar to the Irish Breakfast, but with added lamb chop, chips, and peas.
• Irish stew, a stew of potatoes and lamb (not beef!), with carrots, celery and onions in a watery broth full of flavour
• Bacon and Cabbage, popular and traditional meal in rural Ireland, found on many menus
• Seafood Pie, a traditional dish of chunky fish pieces topped with mashed potato and melted cheese

 

Kiddie Book Club***Kicking Off Irish-American Heritage Month | Culture

Kicking Off Irish- American Heritage Month!

Happy March and Irish American Heritage Month!!

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Being a household of Mixed Heritage, (African-American & Irish-American), it is truly fitting that right after Black History month comes March and Irish American Heritage Month, with St. Patrick’s Day coming on the 17th!!! Good Times. It is very important for us to celebrate and learn about both our African-American & Irish-American culture.

In order to kick off the month here are a couple of excellent books to read about Irish Folklore and Irish- American History to read with your young ones!

Happy Reading.

Irish American Books Ellis Island  Irish American Books

Irish Folklore

 

New Kiddie Book Club Selections | Reading Is Fun

 3 New entries for the Kiddie Book Club!

If you would like to submit ideas please tweet or use instagram at malaika@loftandlearn using the tags of either #loftandlearn, #Loft&Learn/KBC, or #kiddiebookclub

Reading Is Fun!

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Bears Holiday loftandlearn

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